Category Archives: Silicon Valley News

Posted On November 16th, 2017 by Crowded Ocean

Make your brain bigger with these 4 new terms

Analog fever: Call it the rise of the retro or the nostalgic in modern culture, but a reaction to the digital revolution is emerging in the popularity of hybrid design in consumer products that combines simple design with embedded computers.

Meta-learning: A growing trend in AI research is to enable AI-enabled computer systems to master new skills. This will be a significant advance over the single-task systems and robots we know today.

Ethical hacking: When a corporation hires a team of “white hat” software developers or testers, it’s harnessing the power of the good guys to combat the “black hat” bad guys. Companies like @bugcrowd (former Crowded Ocean client) and others (HackerOne, Synack) use crowd-sourced vulnerability testing to help corporations prevent cyber attacks. This white-hat hacker explains all about it here.

YIMBY: New groups have formed in cities around the globe lobbying for the development of affordable housing. They call themselves “yimbys” for “Yes in my backyard”. The movement started in – wait for it – Silicon Valley where the cost of housing, including rental costs, is among the highest in the U.S.

Posted On October 24th, 2017 by Crowded Ocean

Speak like a native: latest tech jargon

Sensor-veillance: Law professor Andrew Ferguson warns that we are entering this new era when “we can expect one device or another (think Fitbit, smartphone, webcam) to be monitoring us much of the time.”

Reverse mentoring: Need a lesson on best practices in social media or how to hire millenials? Maybe you, or your senior executives, need to seek out regular coaching sessions from younger employees. The trend is called reverse mentoring and it’s being embraced by older leaders of established companies around the globe.

Cognitive diversity: Like its cousin “viewpoint diversity”, this trendy notion is that a homogeneous group of, say, a dozen white men could actually represent “diversity” if they bring different life experiences to their job or role in society. The concern, of course is that the goal of racial and gender diversity (the “traditional” or “old-fashioned” kind of diversity) is sidelined by this new idea.

Phubbing: That’s short for “phone snubbing” and it’s the common practice of snubbing others in favor of your mobile phones.

Posted On September 12th, 2017 by Crowded Ocean

Do you speak Silicon Valley? Test your vocab

Dark UX: the UI architects at sites like Facebook are investing in research and testing of subtle changes with “persuasive technologies” to their site to go beyond “increased engagement” by users to foster non-stop interaction, and critics say addiction. There is a sliding scale of intrusiveness, manipulation and safety attributes to elements of Dark UX say industry watchers.

SPAC: the new “special purpose acquisition vehicle” is an alternative route to public ownership for tech startups. According to this article in the Wall Street Journal, “unlike a traditional IPO, SPACs first raise money through a stock offering and then hunt for a deal on which to spend the funds raised.

Liquid democracy: making the power of the vote a digital capability that is combined with blockchains to make it secure as well as borderless. Theoretically, this would be the system that would allow a voter to delegate their vote to someone to represent them. The New Scientist explains in this article. There is even a Liquid Democracy organization based in Berlin.

Biohacking: the latest craze in self-improvement in Silicon Valley combines intermittent fasting with tracking of vital signs like body composition and blood glucose levels.

Posted On July 24th, 2017 by Crowded Ocean

On the radio: startup strategies with Crowded Ocean

Check out Tom and Carol interviewed about The Ultimate Startup Guide:

Listen to KGO Radio 810 Techonomics with host Jason Middleton

  • Part one (11:44 minutes)
  • Part two (19:06 minutes)

Check out more about Techonomics Radio on Facebook.

Posted On May 31st, 2017 by Crowded Ocean

New terms are bubbling up in startup-land

Fat startup: According to the New York Times, the changes in capital markets now favor startups with grander visions and needs for funding levels on the order of hundreds of millions of dollars. As a result, “ideas that once seemed too expensive, too risky or just too crazy are now getting off the ground.” These start-ups are “fat” with capital funding and ambition.

Stack logic: The concept of a “software stack” is well understood in tech-land as separate layers of software working together to accomplish a task. The metaphor of a stack has now bled over to futurists and trend-watchers to describe a common set of resources according to this recent New York Times article.

Genericide: So far, the courts have held up the trademark protection of “Google” but it is quickly following the path of aspirin by transitioning into the mainstream as a verb and thereby causing Alphabet (the Google mother ship) to lose its trademark protection.

Hiring pipeline: This phrase is being used over and over to explain why real progress in gender and ethnic diversity is not evident in management and leadership roles at technology companies. As the theory goes, there simply aren’t enough qualified women or people of color coming into the candidate pool. But there’s more to it, of course.

 

 

Posted On March 28th, 2017 by Crowded Ocean

More chiefs than you can shake a stick at

Your startup must have a few chiefs already: chief executive officer, chief technology officer, chief marketing officer…and maybe now you’re considering hiring a Chief of Staff which is a role that’s becoming popular in larger startups. (See our recent blog on this trend.)

But it turns out there is a veritable explosion of chiefs out there: everything from Chief Customer Officer to Chief Wonk to Chief Algorithms Officer. After a quick tour through LinkedIn, we found a bunch of noteworthy titles listed below. Title inflation? Hard to say. But as a watcher of trends, both good and bad, we caution all startup teams to go easy on handing out the title “chief” (primarily because higher equity expectations come with that title).

Taking a bit of editorial license here: remember that too many chiefs in the kitchen spoil the MVP…

Chief Revenue Officer

https://www.linkedin.com/in/jimhyman/

Chief Algorithms Officer

https://www.linkedin.com/in/ecolson/

Chief Innovation Officer

https://www.linkedin.com/in/mdkail/

Chief Data Scientist

https://www.linkedin.com/in/linderek/

Chief People Officer

https://www.linkedin.com/in/sulovegren/

Chief Network Architect

https://www.linkedin.com/in/jeff-behl-a981471/

Chief Product Officer

ht/tps://www.linkedin.com/in/sunilpotti

Chief Evangelist

https://www.linkedin.com/in/guykawasaki/

Chief Culture and Talent Officer

https://www.linkedin.com/in/apricejr1/

Chief Customer Officer

https://www.linkedin.com/in/coachlillie/

Chief Wonk

https://www.linkedin.com/in/lance-topping-1973b6/

And they’re hiring:

Chief Merchandising Officer

https://www.linkedin.com/jobs/view/281696313/

Chief Impact Officer

https://www.linkedin.com/jobs/view/268895902/

 

 

 

 

Posted On November 15th, 2016 by Crowded Ocean

November edition of fascinating new Silicon Valley jargon

USB condom: a device that blocks the risk of hacking or the transfer of computer viruses when a mobile device is plugged into a public USB port for power or recharging.Screen Shot 2015-01-13 at 9.33.38 AM

“Lights out” factories: a factory that is so completely automated it needs no interior illumination.

Fake news problem: this is a problem that Facebook is grappling with in the wake of their inability to filter out false information that’s posted as “news” on their website today.

Posted On October 11th, 2016 by Crowded Ocean

More new words: the October edition, part two

Glass cliff: according to The New York Times, it’s the theory that holds that women are often placed in positions of power when the situation is dire, men are uninterested and the likelihood of success is low.

Screen Shot 2015-05-19 at 9.01.45 AMSharenting: the practice of online sharing of parenting, including the posting of children at very early ages, shapes the identity (and privacy) of children and that digital identity can follow a child into adulthood.

Behavior design: a principle of software design that coaxes us into adopting new behaviors or habits, as in rewarding the poster of a photo on Facebook with instant “likes”.

Conversational computing: the new market category of consumer and computing products popularized by Siri, Alexa and Echo, are artificially intelligent devices.

 

Posted On August 23rd, 2016 by Crowded Ocean

Living Through History: a Renaissance in Silicon Valley?

Before Tom went into the technology industry, I was an historian—specifically, a Lecturer in Holocaust and Genocide Studies (happy guy, I know). Screen Shot 2016-08-12 at 8.12.32 PMAnd one of the things that we History dweebs would do when we got together was wonder, out loud, what events of today are going to be ‘history-altering’ and which of them, though seemingly important at the moment, are going to be quickly forgotten (see: Trump, Donald).

History is a matter of perspective: the later you come along, the more perspective you have.

For example, it’s hard to image Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo, over a glass of wine in Florence in the early 1500’s, musing to each other: ‘Isn’t it great to be alive during the Renaissance?’ Why? Because they were caught up in something so new that it didn’t have a name. In short, they lacked the perspective to appreciate how unique their situation was.

Screen Shot 2016-08-12 at 8.13.44 PMWhy all this historical musing? Because we have an opportunity that those who have come before us haven’t. We’re living in a time that is easily the equal of the Renaissance (or Industrial Revolution) in terms of its impact—and we should appreciate it now, not in our dotage. Just as the printing press and steam engine dramatically changed the world, so, too, have the internet and the PC/smartphone. And these tools are only a couple of decades old: think what the world will be like as they mature and their availability extends to every corner of the globe.

At Crowded Ocean, given the wide range of companies and industries we work with, we have a ringside seat to a variety of new technologies. Are any of them as potentially impactful as the internet or the PC/smartphone? Probably not (though we’re just scratching the surface of what Artificial Intelligence can do), but it’s important for all of us—not just those of us in the business—to stand back every now and then and marvel at the world we’re living in today and speculate on what tomorrow will bring.

Posted On January 27th, 2016 by Crowded Ocean

Startup Hiring: the declining status of the GPA

In its earliest days Oracle was a very elitist place to work. Its workforce was determinedly young (average age: 24 in 1990) and was generally recruited from a very small number of schools: Harvard, MIT, Stanford and Carnegie Mellon—with a few outliers). And, of course, GPAs figured prominently into the hiring decision.

Screen Shot 2016-01-27 at 11.29.29 AMFast forward to today. I was talking to an Oracle VP the other day and she was telling me that her new department had six programmers—two with Ivy degrees, two with degrees from UC and two who had only graduated high school and who had gone directly into programming.

Earlier this month, I wound up at a fundraiser with a Gartner analyst and the conversation came to the makeup of his department. He said that he didn’t even check GPA—most of the time he didn’t even check what school they attended. The two things that mattered were:

  1. that they had attended a university; and
  2. what they had done since graduation. In other words, accomplishment post-graduation trumped accomplishment pre-graduation.

In the old world there was a hierarchy: in this area, the people who went to community college wound up working for the people who went to a state school, who wound up working for the folks who went to Stanford (maybe Santa Clara). Silicon Valley—with its legion of unschooled developers (and role models like college dropouts Bill Gates and Steve Jobs)—is giving startup entrepreneurs a new hiring model: quite simply, can they do the job? That’s all that matters.