Category Archives: New Marketing Terms

Posted On June 13th, 2017 by Crowded Ocean

Four new terms in startup-land; one inspired by Trump

Prebuttal: a pre-emptive rebuttal, a prebuttal is familiar to anyone following politics and the circus that is President Trump’s administration and Washington D.C. these days.

Neurotech: an emerging field that combines neurology, neuroscience, neurosurgery and the hardware of smartphones is changing the lives of people with innovations like deep-brain stimulators.

Neural lace technology: a hardware innovation of billions of tiny brain electrodes that “may one day allow us to upload and download thoughts,” according to Elon Musk.

FAANG stocks: the giants of technology stocks are closely watched and often trade up and down as a block. That’s FAANG, which stands for Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix and Google (Alphabet).

 

 

Posted On May 31st, 2017 by Crowded Ocean

New terms are bubbling up in startup-land

Fat startup: According to the New York Times, the changes in capital markets now favor startups with grander visions and needs for funding levels on the order of hundreds of millions of dollars. As a result, “ideas that once seemed too expensive, too risky or just too crazy are now getting off the ground.” These start-ups are “fat” with capital funding and ambition.

Stack logic: The concept of a “software stack” is well understood in tech-land as separate layers of software working together to accomplish a task. The metaphor of a stack has now bled over to futurists and trend-watchers to describe a common set of resources according to this recent New York Times article.

Genericide: So far, the courts have held up the trademark protection of “Google” but it is quickly following the path of aspirin by transitioning into the mainstream as a verb and thereby causing Alphabet (the Google mother ship) to lose its trademark protection.

Hiring pipeline: This phrase is being used over and over to explain why real progress in gender and ethnic diversity is not evident in management and leadership roles at technology companies. As the theory goes, there simply aren’t enough qualified women or people of color coming into the candidate pool. But there’s more to it, of course.

 

 

Posted On April 4th, 2017 by Crowded Ocean

April brings new 4 new-ish terms to Silicon Valley

Eco-anxiety: if you’re nervous about climate change, Trump’s “clean coal” delusion, etc., then you’ve got eco-anxiety.

SCIF: Thanks, House Intelligence Committee, for introducing this new word into the mainstream. That’s a sensitive compartmented information facility for reviewing secure and/or illegally obtained documents.

Prenounce: Our president likes to take credit for things that happened before he took office. And now we have a word for that.

Bro culture: If your startup has a diversity problem, then it may be related to its “bro culture” which favors young men, often those who sound solid but who are often inexperienced, cocky and hard to work with.

Posted On March 21st, 2017 by Crowded Ocean

New terminology seeping into the mainstream

Incidental collection: in case you missed this tantalizing term brought to you by the House Intelligence Committee hearings, when the NSA wire-taps a foreigner or U.S. citizen suspected of terrorist activities, they can sometimes collect other communications. That’s NSA-speak now entering the mainstream.

Explainable AI: a field of research that, according to the Wall Street Journal, can explain in natural language how a machine learning model arrives at a logical decision.

Filter bubble: According to the New York Times, “the filter bubble describes the tendency of social networks like Facebook and Twitter to lock users into personalized feedback loops, each with its own news sources, cultural touchstones and political inclinations.”

Echo boomer: Census data indicates that there are more 26-year-olds in the U.S. than people of any other age. Like the baby boomer generation, the economic, retail and labor force of that large number of our population are expected to “echo” the influence of the prior, very large baby boomer generation.

Gaymoji: No explanation required. But if you must, check out this New York Times profile.

Posted On February 22nd, 2017 by Crowded Ocean

Two-word descriptions you’ve probably never heard before

Barista robots: an automated coffee shop called CafeX in San Francisco (of course) is now using robots as baristas.

Artisanal infographics: the always popular, chart- and icon-heavy infographic is a popular marketing tools for brands around the globe. But instead of using data visualization tools or highend graphic design software to create them, some designers are pursuing the hand-crafted look. In other words, don’t throw out that napkin that captured your original genius. It might just work as an “artisanal infographic”

Live chilling: the new way to hang out for the so-called Generation Z, ages early teens to early 20’s, is using live chat applications (Facebook Messenger, etc.) to communicate with a group of friends without ever leaving the house.

Posted On January 30th, 2017 by Crowded Ocean

We use new words, the best words in Silicon Valley

The frightful five: That’s the behemoth tech giants that dominate globally: Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Alphabet (Google) and Microsoft.Screen Shot 2017-01-29 at 6.32.53 PM

Mini-IPO: When a hot robot startup raised a small amount of money, and from an uncommon source, it was called a mini IPO.

“The Pipeline Effect” When companies put women on boards, more women make it into leadership roles at that company.

Phygital: a blend of physical and digital marketing has been dubbed “phygital” and (puhleeze) let’s see if this one sticks.

“The adjacent possible” A new mathematical model that describes how innovation arises is described in an article published January 13, 2017 in The Technology Review as “The adjacent possible is all those things—ideas, words, songs, molecules, genomes, technologies and so on—that are one step away from what actually exists. It connects the actual realization of a particular phenomenon and the space of unexplored possibilities.”

 

Posted On December 20th, 2016 by Crowded Ocean

Some new, some old: the latest lingo of Silicon Valley

It’s time once again for NEW WORDS and PHRASES bubbling up in Silicon Valley…

Screen Shot 2016-04-26 at 10.47.06 AMGAFA: the rest of the world looks upon the technology giants of the left coast (Google, Apple, Facebook and Amazon) and simply refers to them as GAFA.

TAFT: the acronym for “tell them any frigging thing” was the unscrupulous sales practice at Wyndham Vacation Ownership, the nation’s largest time-share operator.

Rat-fucking: made famous in the Watergate era, ratfucking was the term for dirty tricks instigated by Republican operatives on the campaign to re-elect Richard Nixon. Yes, the term is back.

Screen Shot 2015-05-19 at 9.01.45 AMMechanical pixels: scientists are exploring a new display technology based upon graphene to build flexible, durable, energy efficient screens that are superior to LED screens.

Sexist algorithms: it turns out that there is a gender bias inherent in the data sets, called word embeddings, that are being used to train AI tools like chatbots, translation systems and recommendation engines.

culture, marketingPerfect forward secrecy: a security feature built into the end-to-end encryption of programs like WhatsApp that “future-proofs” your messages from new hacker attacks.

Posted On November 15th, 2016 by Crowded Ocean

November edition of fascinating new Silicon Valley jargon

USB condom: a device that blocks the risk of hacking or the transfer of computer viruses when a mobile device is plugged into a public USB port for power or recharging.Screen Shot 2015-01-13 at 9.33.38 AM

“Lights out” factories: a factory that is so completely automated it needs no interior illumination.

Fake news problem: this is a problem that Facebook is grappling with in the wake of their inability to filter out false information that’s posted as “news” on their website today.

Posted On October 26th, 2016 by Crowded Ocean

October: 3 new words in Silicon Valley jargon

Three new terms you really need to know and use, nerds…

ideas

Volunteer computing: donate a share of your computer’s unused storage space and compute power to a scientific project (e.g. the search for signs of extraterrestrial life for SETI or research for a cure to Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s diseases for Stanford University).

Buzzy: when a startup is growing quickly, in the media a lot and watched with envy by other startups with far less momentum, they’re buzzy. A former buzzy startup, Mixpanel, is regrouping to refocus on profitability, according to this recent news article.

Casino effect: there are a set of principles in the design of casinos that keep gamblers gambling. But can that same idea be applied to consumer software design?

Posted On October 11th, 2016 by Crowded Ocean

More new words: the October edition, part two

Glass cliff: according to The New York Times, it’s the theory that holds that women are often placed in positions of power when the situation is dire, men are uninterested and the likelihood of success is low.

Screen Shot 2015-05-19 at 9.01.45 AMSharenting: the practice of online sharing of parenting, including the posting of children at very early ages, shapes the identity (and privacy) of children and that digital identity can follow a child into adulthood.

Behavior design: a principle of software design that coaxes us into adopting new behaviors or habits, as in rewarding the poster of a photo on Facebook with instant “likes”.

Conversational computing: the new market category of consumer and computing products popularized by Siri, Alexa and Echo, are artificially intelligent devices.