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Posted On April 25th, 2017 by Crowded Ocean

Tweets versus coding: lessons for startups

When we meet with a startup led by technical founders, it’s common for us to discover that the majority of the team have profiles or pages on channels like LinkedIn but they are far from active there. In fact, if they have a Twitter handle, it’s probably dormant. Consequently, we never assume that social media is considered by the team as a channel to engage with customers. And startup teams are typically so busy coding and wooing customers in the early days that social media—even if it’s viewed as important (and many tech startups don’t share that view)—is considered a priority for another time. So, what are the lessons for startup teams about when and how best to employ social media?

Taking a phased approach to building your social media program

There’s a phased approach to building smart social media habits that’s very doable and productive. As we outlined in Chapter 14 of our book, The Ultimate Startup Guide, we recommend that during the early days startup teams appoint a single owner of social media. Just as a startup needs a Chief Content Officer to really “own” (but not necessarily produce) all content, your startup needs someone to own your social presence. Choose someone on your team who already has a natural affinity for communicating and connecting via social channels. That’s the person to tap early on to be a rallying point, teacher and role model across your team in the early days of your startup. Remember that it’s temporary. With growth (and revenue!) can come additional staff, a PR agency resource or a dedicated contractor to staff your social media program as you grow.

Name an owner of your social channels         

After appointing an owner, step two is to determine your goals and your audience. And then, step three, prioritize the social channels that will support your goals. The top three channels for many startups tend to be: Twitter (for connecting with prospects, partners and influencers), Youtube (for sharing rich media content_ and LinkedIn (for recruiting new talent and for connecting with customers.) And, down the road, maybe you’ll want a couple of flat screen TVs – one in the lunchroom and one in your lobby – to display tweets and posts in real time to keep your team connected to your customers.