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Posted On September 26th, 2017 by Crowded Ocean

How to make your company vision more like a cause

If you want to make your company vision feel more like a cause, write a manifesto. Here is our manifesto for building the ultimate startup.

  1. Hire the core and outsource the rest. Companies that distinguish their core (sales and go-to-market strategy, technology, product roadmap) from what can be outsourced or hired on-demand maximize flexibility in the face of a changing market dynamics and competition. For example, the program mix, orchestration and sequence of the marketing deliverables is what an experienced head of marketing owns. But, he/she can outsource to specialists deliverables such as SEO, content development, PR, event marketing.

 

  1. Pick your board carefully. Experience and true partnership trumps valuation. A team of experienced investors and advisors can help cultivate and coach a good team to become great. Worry about the structure of the deal (liquidity and preference) more than valuation.

 

  1. Leadership comes with a sell-by date. The familiar tropes of successful startup leaders are the demanding dictator with a mercurial temperament; the brilliant engineer with stunted social and leadership skills; the cerebral and brooding visionary. These are stereotypes today because we’ve seen them at the helm of successful startups over and over. But as soon as the sales numbers falter, out goes the leader. Nowhere is the tenure of the CEO more limited than in an early-stage startup. That’s why startup leaders have to constantly, relentlessly be vigilant that it’s the company that must triumph, not the leader.

 

  1. The most important attribute of company culture is how you make decisions. Successful startups understand where they are on the spectrum of company culture. Culture that matters has nothing to do with whether there are bagels on Wednesdays or free neck massages or whether there is a ping-pong or a foos-ball table on site. Successful companies can be consensus-oriented. They can be transparent or secretive. The but the core of the culture that matters is really all about how decisions are made and better decisions come from well-informed, diverse teams. Diversity as a value

 

  1. Team trumps technology. Smart teams can solve product-market fit misfires. So there is nothing more important to long-term success than hiring the right team. Assume you will make hiring mistakes, so recognizing and firing as early as possible is essential. Salute the industry data that shows diverse teams (gender, ethnicity, psychological) make better decisions and seek out diversity from the beginning.

 

  1. Nail down your positioning during your customer development phase. As you invest early in customer development to identify the profile of the target buyer and use case for your new product, build in time to start nailing down your positioning and messaging. Then, it’s the job of the VP of Marketing to bring a toolkit approach, including a knowledge of “best practices,” and a willingness to pilot new ideas and measure the results to figure out what works to gain early market traction for your new product out in the market.

 

  1. Successful marketing is upstream and integrated. There are steps in the agile software development process – frequent sprints, testing, iteration, repeat – that are popularly applied to company building as part of the “lean startup” mantra. But when it comes to marketing, startups still need to integrate marketing across all sales channels and across all functions and this takes experience and the discipline of planning. Protect your go-to-market strategy as “core”, so it can have its greatest impact positioned upstream in the planning process, at the management table, and right along side customer development.

 

  1. Sales-based marketing accelerates customer acquisition. If it doesn’t initiate sales or make repeat-sales easier, don’t’ do it. An almost rabid focus on customer development first, is what helps drive early market traction. But marketing still requires piloting, testing and measurement to figure out what works. There is no “single tool” approach that will accelerate customer acquisition and shorten time to revenue.

 

  1. Launch is one milestone in the process of building a company, not the finish line. Startups say they launch to “legitimize” their business in the eyes of customers. Some startups say that launch is needed to be able to attract the right talent to build their team in a competitive job market. Still others say launch is about wooing future investors and channel partners. Many say it’s all of the above. Bottom line, launch is about investing in getting your story out in the marketplace in a powerful, differentiated, memorable and unified way in order to connect with stakeholders in order to grow and scale your company. Launch is a milestone in the long life of your company. Don’t make the mistake of thinking of it as the finish line.

 

  1. There can never be too much content. Building market awareness and sales preference for your product requires a boatload of content. Your ability to capture the imagination of your target buyer and to break through the market noise requires a steady stream of new, fresh, updated content. Whether it’s written or rich media (audio, image, video), it’s got to be accessible and shareable and increasingly, it has to be personalized and snackable. Equipping your sales team or channel with the right tools to reach your prospect starts with compelling, consistent, quality content.