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Posted On January 17th, 2017 by Crowded Ocean

Delegation: a much-needed startup CEO skill

Most startup CEOs are like those guys you know who built their own house: they have a wide range of impressive skills and an accompanying high level of confidence. screen-shot-2017-01-16-at-9-37-22-pmWhich can make them great founders and lousy leaders at the same time.

One of the hardest skills for a startup CEO to acquire is the ability to delegate. And it’s understandable why it’s problematic. When it’s your company and you’ve done everything at the start—perhaps including writing the initial website—it’s tough to watch someone with less knowledge about the company or technology try to do something that you could do more quickly, and probably, better.

But the inability to delegate is a one-way ticket to dual destinations: failure (for your company) and the fun house (for you). The key is: how to learn to delegate without seeing your product or company degrade during the process.

Applying “Successive Approximation” as a Training Tactic

The key is the old psychology term: ‘successive approximation’. If it’s a task that can be shared, do it the first time with your successor. Then do a little less the next time and the time after that, until the little bird can fly on its own. If it can’t be shared, then monitor it more tightly (daily, if necessary) so that it doesn’t get too far off track.

Many startups with a great idea or early market success stall out because of their inability to scale. Sometimes it’s the product/technology that can’t scale—or the ability of Sales and Product to support wider success. But just as often, it can be due to the inability of your talent to scale. Which means you never learned that most critical management skill: delegation